• News Release: PGCPS Educators Nominated for Washington Post Awards

    February 28, 2018
    For Immediate Release
    CONTACT:
    Office of Communications
    301-952-6001

    UPPER MARLBORO, MD – Judith P. Hoyer Montessori School Principal Tracey Spivey White and Frances Fuchs Early Childhood Center Adapted Physical Education/Motor Development Specialist Kenneth Kitchelt will compete for the Washington Post Principal of the Year and Teacher of the Year awards, respectively.

    Spivey White and Kitchelt were nominated by their school communities and selected by a committee of their peers to represent Prince George’s County Public Schools (PGCPS).


    “Both nominees deserve our highest praise and appreciation,” said Dr. Kevin M. Maxwell, Chief Executive Officer. “Ms. Spivey White focuses on improving academic achievement, creating a school environment where she empowers students and staff, and building partnerships with parents and the community. Mr. Kitchelt demonstrates a diverse and unique set of teaching skills, as well as a deep dedication to students every day, and consistently motivates his students to do their very best.”


    The Washington Post will announce winners of both awards on March 5. Winners will receive a signature trophy, $7,500 monetary award, feature spot on a half-page ad in The Washington Post and be profiled in the newspaper. All nominees will receive certificates of appreciation. For details, click here.


    Traci Spivey White

    Spivey White earned a bachelor’s degree from North Carolina Central University in 1992 and a master’s degree in Educational Leadership from Trinity University. She started her career in PGCPS in 1993 as a Montessori classroom teacher. Prior to joining Judith P. Hoyer Montessori in 2012, she served in various leadership positions, including program coordinator at Robert Goddard Montessori, middle school administrator at Isaac J. Gourdine Middle School and Regional Academic Facilitator for Imagine Schools.


    Since then, Spivey White has promoted a collaborative, positive culture of teaching and learning. She empowers staff by engaging them in the decision-making process, encouraging teamwork, and providing professional development to build their capacity as teachers and team members.


    Under her leadership, the school has become a Maryland Green School, constructed an outdoor classroom, established a peace committee, expanded after school enrichment programs and learning opportunities, and embraced arts integration.

    “Ms. Spivey White is a courageous and creative leader who goes beyond the data points to reach her staff,” said Carolyn Davis, Arts Integration Coordinator. “She is truly a champion for teachers and students.”

    Kenneth Kitchelt

    Kitchelt has been an adapted physical educator for nearly 40 years, serving students at Frances Fuchs Early Childhood Center since 1980. Prior to joining Prince George’s County, he taught in Santa Clara County Public Schools in San Jose, California.


    He received a bachelor’s degree in physical education from Towson University and a master’s in adapted physical education from the University of South Florida.


    At Francis Fuche, he helps students build skills by providing personalized accommodations and modifications to the learning environment in the classroom, the school playground and the community. He mentors University of Maryland student interns, as well as newly-hired Adaptive Physical Education teachers, and plays a key role in engaging parents in workshops. He is a member of the School Instructional Leadership and Crisis Intervention teams, chairs the school’s multicultural initiatives, and leads in planning the annual International Night celebration and Fall Festival.


    “Mr. Kitchelt demonstrates excellence in every activity he is involved in,” said Principal Diedra Tramel. “His students know in their hearts that they are capable, viable individuals – each one a winner.”


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    Prince George's County Public Schools (PGCPS), one of the nation's 25 largest school districts, has 208 schools and centers, more than 130,000 students and nearly 19,000 employees. The school system serves a diverse student population from urban, suburban and rural communities located in the Washington, DC suburbs. PGCPS is nationally recognized for innovative programs and initiatives that provide students with unique learning opportunities, including arts integration, environmental and financial literacy, and language immersion.